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2014, 28 min., HD video, Colour, Sound, 16:9, Slovenian with English subtitles 

 škuc

 We Need a Title, Installation view, Škuc gallery, 2015

 

Hodoscek made the video in collaboration with six members of school debate club. In the school year 2013 / 2014 the members participated in a sort of parallel curricula initiated by the artist. The departure point of the debate was the legacy and potentiality of the Non-Aligned Movement (First NAM conference in Belgrade, 1961). Pupils engaged themselves into a thought process where they reflected upon the idea of the third politics today, new forms of communism and their own role within family, institutional and social structure. The artist, however, was interested in the transitional moment from the act of speaking to a moment of collective being and working together. The pupils, very well drifted in their role as debaters, in this work transform into poets. The video documents a process of writing a collective poem that expresses their mutual concerns. However, the moment of being and doing things together is a complicated process, since individual voices have to be in sync with the overall interest of the group. The video exposes moments of the mutual effort of creation, disagreement or points of negotiation.

 

We need a Title 1 

 

pesem 

 

 

With: Lara Čalasan Dorn, Tinkara Godec, Sergeja Hrvatič, Tjaša Lea Kosmatin, Matej Ocvirk and Jure Macuh

Thanks to: Miha Gartner, Miha Ožek

 

Commissioned by the Travelling Communiqué project in Belgrade June 10 to August 17, 2014. 

Travelling Communiqué is a durational project that relies on common authorship. It is curated by Armin Linke (Italy/Germany), Doreen Mende (Germany) and Milica Tomić (born in former Yugoslavia) in permanent discussion with Yero Adugna Eticha (Ethiopia), Kader Attia (Algeria/France), and Fabian Bechtle (Germany). Produced in collaboration with the Museum of Yugoslav History Belgrade, funded by the Ministry of Culture and Information of the Republic of Serbia, and in cooperation with the Goethe-Institut Belgrade, funded by the Foreign Office of the Federal Republic of Germany.